A related issue is the potential use of testosterone as a coronary vasodilator and anti-anginal agent. Testosterone has been shown to act as a vasodilator of coronary arteries at physiological concentrations during angiography (Webb, McNeill et al 1999). Furthermore men given a testosterone injection prior to exercise testing showed improved performance, as assessed by ST changes compared to placebo (Rosano et al 1999; Webb, Adamson et al 1999). Administration of one to three months of testosterone treatment has also been shown to improve symptoms of angina and exercise test performance (Wu and Weng 1993; English et al 2000; Malkin, Pugh, Morris et al 2004). Longer term studies are underway. It is thought that testosterone improves angina due its vasodilatory action, which occurs independently of the androgen receptor, via blockade of L-type calcium channels at the cell membrane of the vascular smooth muscle in an action similar to the dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers such as nifedipine (Hall et al 2006).
^ Jump up to: a b Travison TG, Vesper HW, Orwoll E, Wu F, Kaufman JM, Wang Y, Lapauw B, Fiers T, Matsumoto AM, Bhasin S (April 2017). "Harmonized Reference Ranges for Circulating Testosterone Levels in Men of Four Cohort Studies in the United States and Europe". The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 102 (4): 1161–1173. doi:10.1210/jc.2016-2935. PMC 5460736. PMID 28324103.
The only other concern regarding Testosterone Max is that it is a Crazy Bulk product, and their products are generally more directed towards the bodybuilding crowd. With that said, it does contain the necessary ingredients in order to raise testosterone levels, and that’s what produces the benefits. Therefore, as long as it can achieve boosted testosterone levels, which it can, it can be deemed an effective supplement.
So, how does one ensure that testosterone levels remain in balance? Some doctors suggest that monitoring testosterone levels every five years, starting at age 35, is a reasonable strategy to follow. If the testosterone level falls too low or if the individual has the signs and symptoms of low testosterone levels described above, testosterone therapy can be considered. However, once testosterone therapy is initiated, testosterone levels should be closely monitored to make sure that the testosterone level does not become too high, as this may cause stress on the individual, and high testosterone levels may result in some of the negative problems (described previously) seen.
Fatherhood decreases testosterone levels in men, suggesting that the emotions and behavior tied to decreased testosterone promote paternal care. In humans and other species that utilize allomaternal care, paternal investment in offspring is beneficial to said offspring's survival because it allows the parental dyad to raise multiple children simultaneously. This increases the reproductive fitness of the parents, because their offspring are more likely to survive and reproduce. Paternal care increases offspring survival due to increased access to higher quality food and reduced physical and immunological threats.[60] This is particularly beneficial for humans since offspring are dependent on parents for extended periods of time and mothers have relatively short inter-birth intervals.[61] While extent of paternal care varies between cultures, higher investment in direct child care has been seen to be correlated with lower average testosterone levels as well as temporary fluctuations.[62] For instance, fluctuation in testosterone levels when a child is in distress has been found to be indicative of fathering styles. If a father's testosterone levels decrease in response to hearing their baby cry, it is an indication of empathizing with the baby. This is associated with increased nurturing behavior and better outcomes for the infant.[63]
Here’s a scary thought: You may be less of a man than your father was—at least hormonally. A study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism found that, on average, testosterone levels were higher in men of the same age in the ’80s than they were in the 2000s (due, researchers speculate, to higher rates of obesity and the wider use of medication these days).  
Testosterone belongs to a class of male hormones called androgens, which are sometimes called steroids or anabolic steroids. In men, testosterone is produced mainly in the testes, with a small amount made in the adrenal glands. The brain's hypothalamus and pituitary gland control testosterone production. The hypothalamus instructs the pituitary gland on how much testosterone to produce, and the pituitary gland passes the message on to the testes. These communications happen through chemicals and hormones in the bloodstream.
When you get tested, your doctor will see if you require supplementation. I try and have clients maintain a serum blood level between 50 and 80 ng/mL. Studies have shown that men with lower levels of vitamin D had lower levels of testosterone. If a man tests below my preferred range, I typically recommend 5,000 IUs a day until the levels improve. Vitamin D3 supplements are widely available (best is to get one that contains vitamin K as well, as that allows for greater absorption), and you can also bump up your sunlight exposure. I find, and studies confirm this, that many men are deficient in vitamin D and it is a huge issue relating to testosterone levels.

Don't avoid natural fats. Many people think that all fat is bad and should be avoided, particularly by teenagers who are overweight. However, natural fats and cholesterol from animal products (meat, eggs, dairy) are essential nutrients, especially for the production of sex-related hormones such as testosterone.[4] Eating moderate amounts of saturated and unsaturated fats does not typically trigger weight gain — too many refined carbohydrates and artificial trans fat are the real culprits of obesity. In fact, some studies show that low-fat diets reduce testosterone levels in males, as well as create other growth and development problems.[5] Research indicates that a diet with less than 40% of the energy derived from fat leads to decreased testosterone levels.[6]
Unlike women, who experience a rapid drop in hormone levels at menopause, men experience a more gradual decrease of testosterone levels over time. The older the man, the more likely he is to experience below-normal testosterone levels. Men with testosterone levels below 300 ng/dL may experience some degree of low T symptoms. Your doctor can conduct a blood test and recommend treatment if needed. They can discuss the potential benefits and risks of testosterone medication, as well.
For people who are worried about low or high testosterone, a doctor may perform a blood test to measure the amount of the hormone in the patient's blood. When doctors find low-T, they may prescribe testosterone therapy, in which the patient takes an artificial version of the hormone. This is available in the following forms: a gel to be applied to the upper arms, shoulders or abdomen daily; a skin patch put on the body or scrotum twice a day; a solution applied to the armpit; injections every two or three weeks; a patch put on the gums twice a day; or implants that last four to six months.
The aim of treatment for hypogonadism is to normalize serum testosterone levels and abolish symptoms or pathological states that are due to low testosterone levels. The exact target testosterone level is a matter of debate, but current recommendations advocate levels in the mid-lower normal adult range (Nieschlag et al 2005). Truly physiological testosterone replacement would require replication of the diurnal rhythm of serum testosterone levels, but there is no current evidence that this is beneficial (Nieschlag et al 2005).

Male sex characteristics greatly depend on testosterone synthesis in your body. If you keep the levels of this hormone normal, you will prevent sexual potency issues. Accordingly, the elevation of testosterone levels helps combat the impairment of erectile function. The levels of this hormone also affect male fertility. If these levels grow, fertility improves. Aging has a negative impact on testosterone secretion. Such hormonal imbalance is inevitable and permanent. But it’s still possible to positively change the situation and stimulate hormone production by using the high-quality testosterone boosters.


Zinc is so important relating to hormone balance and many other functions (fertility, immunity, and insulin sensitivity to name just a few), as well as dopamine production—which helps support mood, drive, and interest. Many men, especially over the age of 60, have low zinc levels. A great start is to eat more foods containing zinc like oysters, fermented foods, and proteins (preferably grass-fed beef and wild-caught salmon). I often recommend 50 to 60 mg daily if taking as a supplement.
To find the best testosterone booster, we collected every supplement available on BodyBuilding.com, and cross-checked our list against the top results on best of lists like MensFitness, BroScience, and BodyNutrition. We only looked at pills since some of the ingredients in testosterone boosters have a reputation for tasting bad, and powders just prolong the experience. There are a lot — 133 of them to be precise — and they all claim to boost testosterone levels. Testosterone (for men) is “thought to regulate sex drive (libido), bone mass, fat distribution, muscle mass and strength, and the production of red blood cells and sperm.” If a supplement can increase your natural testosterone levels, the rest should follow. As we mentioned above, it’s not that simple, and at best, you’ll experience only a short-lived boost.

Testosterone was first used as a clinical drug as early as 1937, but with little understanding of its mechanisms. The hormone is now widely prescribed to men whose bodies naturally produce low levels. But the levels at which testosterone deficiency become medically relevant still aren’t well understood. Normal testosterone production varies widely in men, so it’s difficult to know what levels have medical significance. The hormone’s mechanisms of action are also unclear.
One study found that men who took 3,332 international units (IU) of vitamin D daily for one year significantly increased their testosterone levels. But vitamin D supplements may only work for men who are severely deficient in this specific vitamin. Another study found that men without a vitamin D deficiency had no increase in testosterone levels after taking vitamin D.
^ Mehta PH, Jones AC, Josephs RA (Jun 2008). "The social endocrinology of dominance: basal testosterone predicts cortisol changes and behavior following victory and defeat" (PDF). Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 94 (6): 1078–93. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.336.2502. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.94.6.1078. PMID 18505319. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 19, 2009.
"I'm 53 years old and my passion is surfing the oceans worldwide – big waves. Since taking Andro400, I'm now down to my ideal weight – from 185 to 175 now which is probably a net 15 pound loss, taking into account that the increased muscle I have now is heavier than the fat it replaced. My energy level is up. I feel strong and more physically fit in general. Also, from surfing I have been injured many times – for example I've broken my neck and pelvis among other things. Taking Andro400, I have much less pain overall – and I've been able to take less pain medication and anti-inflammatory drugs.”

Dr. Anthony’s Notes: I use Maca often in cycles throughout the year. I typically buy the raw Maca powder, which has a VERY “dirt-like” earthy taste. Beware if you are a bit squeamish on tastes! How To Take Maca: 1500-3000mg of Maca powder is a typical dosage take daily alongside food. From personal experience, I've found that it’s best to buy the Maca powder as a standalone supplement and throw it into a blended protein shake to mask the taste.


A number of research groups have tried to further define the relationship of testosterone and body composition by artificial alteration of testosterone levels in eugonadal populations. Induction of a hypogonadal state in healthy men (Mauras et al 1998) or men with prostate cancer (Smith et al 2001) using a gonadotrophin-releasing-hormone (GnRH) analogue was shown to produce increases in fat mass and decreased fat free mass. Another experimental approach in healthy men featured suppression of endogenous testosterone production with a GnRH analogue, followed by treatment with different doses of weekly intramuscular testosterone esters for 20 weeks. Initially the experiments involved men aged 18–35 years (Bhasin et al 2001) but subsequently the study was repeated with a similar protocol in men aged 60–75 years (Bhasin et al 2005). The different doses given were shown to produce a range of serum concentrations from subphysiological to supraphysiological (Bhasin et al 2001). A given testosterone dose produced higher serum concentrations of testosterone in the older age group (Bhasin et al 2005). Subphysiological dosing of testosterone produced a gain in fat mass and loss of fat free mass during the study. There were sequential decreases in fat mass and increases in fat free mass with each increase of testosterone dose. These changes in body composition were seen in physiological and supraphysiological treatment doses. The trend was similar in younger versus older men but the gain of fat mass at the lowest testosterone dose was less prominent in older patients (Bhasin et al 2001; Bhasin et al 2005). With regard to muscle function, the investigators showed dose dependent increases in leg strength and power with testosterone treatment in young and older men but there was no improvement in fatigability (Storer et al 2003; Bhasin et al 2005).
For example, the study published in Obesity Research tells that the scientists measured testosterone levels in two groups of middle-aged men with obesity. One group underwent a 16-week weight loss program, while the second group did nothing. Each participant of the first group lost 20 kg on the average. And these participants experienced a significant increase in testosterone levels. So, the fight against overweight is very important for those who want to overcome testosterone deficiency. But starvation is strictly forbidden because this is a stressful situation which leads to the sharp decline in T levels.
Any day that you don’t get 20 minutes of direct sunlight on your skin, you want to supplement with 5,000 IUs of vitamin D3. If you get your blood levels tested and you’re extremely low — below 50 IUs — you typically want to do 5,000 IUs twice a day for three months until you get those numbers up. You can do everything in the world, but if your vitamin D levels aren’t right, your testosterone levels will stay low.
A huge amount of D-aspartic acid isn’t the only thing keeping this supplement ranked elite. Testogen has much more to offer, including proven ingredients such as tribulus terrestris, ginseng extract, zinc, and more. To learn more about what each individual ingredient does and how they work to boost your testosterone levels, be sure to check out the full review.
Testosterone is the primary male sex hormone and an anabolic steroid. In male humans, testosterone plays a key role in the development of male reproductive tissues such as testes and prostate, as well as promoting secondary sexual characteristics such as increased muscle and bone mass, and the growth of body hair.[2] In addition, testosterone is involved in health and well-being,[3] and the prevention of osteoporosis.[4] Insufficient levels of testosterone in men may lead to abnormalities including frailty and bone loss.
12. We keep you informed with a FREE eNewsletter – a $19.95 value. Every month, we send a short science-backed newsletter updating you on the latest research on Testosterone and your health. In addition, we email once-a-week “T-Tips” which are brief, to-the-point tips to help you see better results. This is a $19.95 value absolutely FREE to our customers!

“Eat often if you want to keep your testosterone high. People who go on starvation diets are destroying their testosterone levels. Its one of the worst things you can do.” – It is proved scientifically that fasting increases testosterone and HGH levels, and when you eat, insulin levels go up, testosterone goes down! so eating often will keep insulin levels up and T….
At the present time, it is suggested that androgen replacement should take the form of natural testosterone. Some of the effects of testosterone are mediated after conversion to estrogen or dihydrotestosterone by the enzymes aromatase and 5a-reductase enzymes respectively. Other effects occur independently of the traditional action of testosterone via the classical androgen receptor- for example, its action as a vasodilator via a cell membrane action as described previously. It is therefore important that the androgen used to treat hypogonadism is amenable to the action of these metabolizing enzymes and can also mediate the non-androgen receptor actions of testosterone. Use of natural testosterone ensures this and reduces the chance of non-testosterone mediated adverse effects. There are now a number of testosterone preparations which can meet these recommendations and the main factor in deciding between them is patient choice.
There is an increased incidence of hypogonadism in men with rheumatoid arthritis. Tengstrand et al (2002) studied hormonal levels in 104 men with rheumatoid arthritis and 99 age-matched healthy men. They divided their subjects into 3 age groups: 30–49, 40–59, 60–69. Mean non-sex hormone binding globulin-bound testosterone (bioavailable testosterone) was lower in men with rheumatoid arthritis for each of the three groups. LH was also found to be lower in the patients with rheumatoid arthritis suggesting a hypothalamic-pituitary cause of the reduced bioavailable testosterone. Of the 104 men with rheumatoid arthritis, 33 had hypogonadism compared to 7 of the 99 healthy controls.
Many clinical studies have looked at the effect of testosterone treatment on body composition in hypogonadal men or men with borderline low testosterone levels. Some of these studies specifically examine these changes in older men (Tenover 1992; Morley et al 1993; Urban et al 1995; Sih et al 1997; Snyder et al 1999; Kenny et al 2001; Ferrando et al 2002; Steidle et al 2003; Page et al 2005). The data from studies, on patients from all age groups, are consistent in showing an increase in fat free mass and decrease in fat mass or visceral adiposity with testosterone treatment. A recent meta-analysis of 16 randomized controlled trials of testosterone treatment effects on body composition confirms this pattern (Isidori et al 2005). There have been less consistent results with regard to the effects of testosterone treatment of muscle strength. Some studies have shown an increase in muscle strength (Ferrando et al 2002; Page et al 2005) with testosterone whilst others have not (Snyder et al 1999). Within the same trial some muscle group strengths may improve whilst others do not (Ly et al 2001). It is likely that the differences are partly due to the methodological variations in assessing strength, but it also possible that testosterone has different effects on the various muscle groups. The meta-analysis found trends toward significant improvements in dominant knee and hand grip strength only (Isidori et al 2005).
Many studies showed the property of garlic in the proliferation and restoration effects on testosterone levels. It’s thought that this is due to a chemical in garlic known as diallyl sulfide. Diallyl-disulfide stimulates the synthesis of luteinizing hormone in the pituitary gland. Luteinizing hormone causes an increase in testosterone production in the Leydig cells of the testis.

While researchers in Brisbane, Australia, found that while Testofen (“a standardized [fenugreek] extract and mineral formulation”) significantly improved the sexual arousal, orgasm, and the general quality of life of participants, it did not remarkably increase testosterone above normal levels. Participants who took Testofen were more satisfied with their energy, well-being, and muscle strength than those who took the placebo.
If you still feel the need to supplement, keep in mind that supplemental magnesium is more likely than dietary magnesium to cause adverse effects, which is why the FDA fixed at 350 mg the Tolerable Upper Intake Level for magnesium supplementation in adults. Also, you may want to avoid magnesium oxide: it has poor bioavailability (rats absorbed only 15% in one study,[43] and humans only 4% in another[44]) and can cause intestinal discomfort and diarrhea.
So if you’re intent on maximizing your testosterone levels, and/or you have applied all of the above and you’re still not satisfied with your results (which would be surprising) then you could try the below. I will point out that some of these tips may not have the scientific evidence to back them up like the previous points, but I can assure you that either I have or do use them (and have positive results), or a client has used them with pleasing results, or finally it is such a new conception that there isn’t enough evidence to prove it one way or another.
The effect excess testosterone has on the body depends on both age and sex. It is unlikely that adult men will develop a disorder in which they produce too much testosterone and it is often difficult to spot that an adult male has too much testosterone. More obviously, young children with too much testosterone may enter a false growth spurt and show signs of early puberty and young girls may experience abnormal changes to their genitalia. In both males and females, too much testosterone can lead to precocious puberty and result in infertility. 
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