At the National Population and Family Development Board in Malaysia, men between the ages of 31 and 52 were given two capsules of the herb (E. longifolia) in Andro400 every day for three weeks. They reported erections were stronger and, in some cases, lasted longer. Overall, they felt more virile. Their levels of testosterone doubled within three weeks.5
So if you’re intent on maximizing your testosterone levels, and/or you have applied all of the above and you’re still not satisfied with your results (which would be surprising) then you could try the below. I will point out that some of these tips may not have the scientific evidence to back them up like the previous points, but I can assure you that either I have or do use them (and have positive results), or a client has used them with pleasing results, or finally it is such a new conception that there isn’t enough evidence to prove it one way or another.

Heavy metal, fluoride, chlorine, pesticides, dioxins and other dangerous chemicals that are in our food, products and even the air we breath are wreaking absolute havoc on our endocrine systems (responsible for testosterone production). It’s hard to avoid these (especially if you’re a smoker) but they are major contributors to man’s decline in testosterone.


If you do take DAA I recommend cycling it (i.e. 5 days on, 2 off, over 4 weeks then 4 weeks off). And taking it with an aromatase inhibitor (which ensures the aspartic acid doesn’t get converted to estrogen). Especially as more studies are coming out showing the increase in testosterone is limited to a week or two before it drops back to normal levels.
Epimedium is also known as horny goat weed which is used as an aphrodisiac and testosterone booster. A recent study on rats showed that horny goat weed increased testosterone levels. At low doses, it is shown to improve bone strength in females. It also has an active ingredient Icariin which is responsible for the aphrodisiac effect of horny goat weed.
Testosterone [Figure 1] is the main male sex hormone. It is responsible for male sexuality and is the main hormone-producing the features associated with masculinity such as substantial muscle mass, facial hair, libido, and sperm production.[1] Besides, the hormone has other vital functions as the basic chemical composition of testosterone is steroidal; and steroids are known to have significant physiological, as well as psychological, effects in male individuals, especially adults.[1] Testosterone production is reduced gradually in men starting from the age of 30.[2] Hence, testosterone blood concentrations slowly diminish as age progresses. As a result, men may experience a number of physiological and psychological events, such as a lack of sex-drive, erectile dysfunction, acute depression, fatigue, low energy levels, and insomnia.[3]
Looking for ingredients that work in the realm of supplements can be like finding a needle in a haystack. Testosterone boosters, like all dietary supplements, are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration prior to marketing. This lack of oversight dates back to the 1994 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA), which stipulated that purveyors of supplements weren’t required to prove the safety of their products or the veracity of what’s on the labels to the FDA before listing them for sale. Often, there isn’t a lot of scientific backing behind an ingredient, or research has been done solely on animals, not humans.
This evidence, together with the beneficial effects of testosterone replacement on central obesity and diabetes, raises the question whether testosterone treatment could be beneficial in preventing or treating atherosclerosis. No trial of sufficient size or duration has investigated the effect of testosterone replacement in primary or secondary prevention cardiovascular disease. The absence of such data leads us to examine the relationship of testosterone to other cardiovascular risk factors, such as adverse lipid parameters, blood pressure, endothelial dysfunction, coagulation factors, inflammatory markers and cytokines. This analysis can supply evidence of the likely effects of testosterone on overall cardiovascular risk. This has limitations, however, including the potential for diverging effects of testosterone on the various factors involved and the resultant impossibility of accurately predicting the relative impact of such changes.
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Both testosterone and 5α-DHT are metabolized mainly in the liver.[1][151] Approximately 50% of testosterone is metabolized via conjugation into testosterone glucuronide and to a lesser extent testosterone sulfate by glucuronosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, respectively.[1] An additional 40% of testosterone is metabolized in equal proportions into the 17-ketosteroids androsterone and etiocholanolone via the combined actions of 5α- and 5β-reductases, 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and 17β-HSD, in that order.[1][151][152] Androsterone and etiocholanolone are then glucuronidated and to a lesser extent sulfated similarly to testosterone.[1][151] The conjugates of testosterone and its hepatic metabolites are released from the liver into circulation and excreted in the urine and bile.[1][151][152] Only a small fraction (2%) of testosterone is excreted unchanged in the urine.[151]
A study out of the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in Belton, Texas, examined the effects of fenugreek supplementation on strength and body composition in resistance-trained men. Researchers found that while both the placebo and fenugreek groups significantly increased their strength during the first four weeks, only the fenugreek group saw significant increases in strength after eight weeks of training and supplementation.[5]
It sounds like a creature from Jurassic World, but this plant is worth learning to pronounce, especially if you haven’t had great sex since dinosaurs roamed the earth. A 2012 study showed that consuming six grams of tribulus root for 60 days improved erections and frequency of sex in men with low sperm counts. It also reduced sexual fatigue. Furthermore, their testosterone jumped by a whopping 16%. “Trib,” as it’s called, is thorny and bitter, so look to a supplement for consuming it. Epiq’s Quad Test includes Tribulus terrestris. (epiqresults.com)
In contrast to steroids, testosterone boosters have a fully different mechanism of action. They are the products which contain the natural ingredients only. These ingredients act by stimulating the man’s body to synthesize own testosterone. So, testosterone levels grow naturally without negative health effects associated with the intake of steroids.

We should probably start with the elephant in the room: do these supplements increase testosterone? The answer is probably yes. There are some ingredients that help convince your body to produce more testosterone, but there’s a catch. Testosterone boosters aren’t actually great at boosting; that is, at pushing your testosterone levels above your healthy, normal balance. Boosters typically act more like restorers — helping bring low testosterone levels back to that healthy equilibrium rather than boosting you above normal testosterone levels. Just like how if you have anemia, taking a vitamin B12 supplement can help restore your energy and reduce fatigue, but if your B12 levels are good, a supplement won’t give you super energy levels to stay awake for three days — your body will likely just process (read: pee) out the extra.

Butter is notorious for its saturated fat. However, it contains a small amount of vitamin D. With the help of its fat content it will also aid your body to absorb and use the vitamin D from other sources. Butter is a healthy as long as you consume it moderately. Don't swallow it as a whole as you think it'll boost up testosterone instantly. You will end up being the opposite way you want.
Inaccurate or misinterpreted test results can either falsely diagnose or miss a case of testosterone deficiency. Your testosterone level should be measured between 7 am and 10 am, when it's at its peak. Confirm a low reading with a second test on a different day. It may require multiple measurements and careful interpretation to establish bioavailable testosterone, or the amount of the hormone that is able to have effects on the body. Consider getting a second opinion from an endocrinologist.
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