About: Christie literally just got going (her first post was in March). But she didn’t waste any time putting it all out there. Her goal is to lose more than 100 pounds and beat a lifelong struggle with depression and anxiety. Her openness caught our attention immediately, and we can’t wait to follow along with her as she takes each and every step.
Brit is an amazing woman, and her blog is even more amazing that you could possibly imagine. She is a health and workout instructor, and the main reason she created this blog is because she is eager to help you restore your hope, health and self-confidence through a provision of free and high-quality fitness and a good nutritious meal. Also, she named her blog GRIT because she will help you achieve it, and grit stands for perseverence and passion for long term goals. She constantly posts authentic personal accounts, healthy diet tips and plans, and custom designed workouts. She believes in being free to be as healthy as you want to be, be fierce, because the workouts she would have prepared are extremely effective but intense, and finally, she believes in fitness, and that is the physical activity and a lot of exercising. If you are ready to make a change on your body through exercising, try her methods, they are amazing.
HCG (Human Chorionic Gonadotropin) is an all-natural hormone which, when taken with a low-calorie diet, helps the body convert stored fat to energy while maintaining muscle mass. What makes us different is we only offer medical-grade HCG. This program is great for helping people who have struggled with a slowing metabolism, hormone imbalance, or menopause to lose up to 15 pounds more per month.

Hi! I have to say 600 calories is terrible! You are going to starve your body. On average without exercise, your body burns at least 1400 calories, if you are eating only 600 calories you are not fueling your body with proper nutrition. When this happens your body goes into starvation mode and you end up gaining weight to, worse yet, end up sickly. Don’t do that to yourself, please! When I added more calories into my diet, I gradually added more, like a 200 a week. I gave myself an extra snack. I don’t recall if I gained weight at the beginning, but I do know I lost weight when I ate more. Don’t be afraid to eat!! What I would do if I were you is add more protein into your diet, like eggs, greek yogurt, lean chicken. You also need a little fat like avocado, olive oil or peanut butter. I personally found the hardest thing about dieting is not being able to stick to it. I dieted for 2 years lost weight, but then life happened. I eat healthy but what I started back when I was dieting I was eating low calorie, now I eat what normal people eat and I gained some weight back. But I realized what I was doing to my body back then, I wasn’t able to do that for the rest of my life. My advice is to eat healthy, eat what is in your calorie range and exercise for 30 minutes a day, even if it is just a walk. Doing this is a set-up for permanent weight lose and you will be healthy. I learned over the years that a healthy body on the inside, shows on the outside and even if you gain a little weight you are better off.

I saw a post on pinterest for your pumpkin spice drink and started clicking around! Congratulations on your weight loss! I have just started working out regularly for the first time (just about) in my whole life. But what I’ve been learning slowly, even before I began the physical regimen, is how important it is to eat real food. Thanks to people around me who love food and their families health enough to really get informed about it, I’ve been seeing just how misinformed we are and how duped we can be by clever marketing that claims to be “healthy”. When I learned where skim milk comes from and how it’s made (and, for instance that it’s used to fatten pigs up) and that real dairy fats (in moderation) are linked to weight loss but “fat-free” items quite the opposite, I was stunned! Then I thought, of course! People were eating the real things long before heart disease and obesity ravaged our culture. When you start to learn about real nutrition instead of what we’ve been sold by industries, it can be a really great weight loss tool. And, I have to say thank you for using things like coconut milk in some of your recipes! I have a dairy intolerance and it’s nice to know that for the pumpkin spice recipe, at least, I wouldn’t have to tweak it myself!!! I look forward to reading more and trying some of your creations!


^ McMillan-Price, J.; Petocz, P.; Atkinson, F.; O'neill, K.; Samman, S.; Steinbeck, K.; Caterson, I.; Brand-Miller, Janette Cecile (2006). Written at Human Nutrition Unit, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. "Comparison of 4 Diets of Varying Glycemic Load on Weight Loss and Cardiovascular Risk Reduction in Overweight and Obese Young Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial" (PDF). Archives of Internal Medicine. USA (published 24 July 2006). 166 (14): 1466–75. doi:10.1001/archinte.166.14.1466. PMID 16864756.
21. Keep it simple. "I take a minimalist approach to nutrition: My diet consists of lean protein (chicken breast, egg whites, ground turkey), complex carbs (quinoa, sweet potatoes, oatmeal), healthy fats (coconut oil, almonds, avocados), and leafy green veggies. I eat as clean as I can—locally-grown vegetables, organic when possible, and minimally-processed everything."
Working in an office means I am often surrounded by cakes, biscuits, sweets and other tempting goodies. Sometimes I will have a small treat but most of the time I resist and stay on track. What I find most difficult about this is the comments I receive from others. For example, if they notice I haven’t eaten a treat they will say ‘Chloe why haven’t you had one?’, there is almost peer pressure to eat something just because everyone else is (which sounds crazy but it’s true!) Don’t fall into the trap of eating something for the sake of it or due to peer pressure, if you don’t want it then don’t eat it – in 5 minutes other people won’t even remember if you have eaten their cake or not! Another tip which I find useful is to say ‘no thanks I don’t eat that’ rather than ‘I can’t eat that’ which implies you’re not allowed or your restricted, saying ‘I don’t’ implies that you are in control.

About: Gina has the kind of success story that really touches a nerve. She started out at 298 pounds and went on to lose 168 of those pounds in 25 months. As someone who always struggled with her weight and achieved such a huge thing, she has an especially good grasp on how to help other people who have 100 or more pounds to lose achieve their goals. Her blog is a place she uses to motivate, inspire, energize and connect with others. And that’s exactly what it is.
The motto of this blog is to lose some weight without losing any of your sense of humor. And it is a rather good motto indeed! The blog is courtesy of two women from different cities in California, April from San Francisco and Alyssa from Los Angeles, and they have filled this site up with humor as you could never imagine, it is hilarious! These two women, who by the way happen to be sisters, have created this awesome blog in order to keep track of their weight losing process and share their laughs about it with everyone. But not only that, they have both managed to squeeze in some difficult subjects that everyone who tries to lose some weight encounter, and that is the quitting phase, the not being strong enough phase. They have truly made themselves into amazing and good people who try to help others and also, make their day better!
This fragrant, Italian-flavored soup takes advantage of quick-cooking ingredients--boneless, skinless chicken breast, bagged baby spinach and canned beans. It features a simple homemade basil pesto swirled in at the end to add a fresh herb flavor. If you are very pressed for time, you can substitute 3 to 4 tablespoons of a store-bought basil pesto. Recipe by Nancy Baggett for EatingWell.
Very low calorie diets provide 200–800 calories per day, maintaining protein intake but limiting calories from both fat and carbohydrates. They subject the body to starvation and produce an average loss of 1.5–2.5 kg (3.3–5.5 lb) per week. "2-4-6-8", a popular diet of this variety, follows a four-day cycle in which only 200 calories are consumed the first day, 400 the second day, 600 the third day, 800 the fourth day, and then totally fasting, after which the cycle repeats. These diets are not recommended for general use as they are associated with adverse side effects such as loss of lean muscle mass, increased risks of gout, and electrolyte imbalances. People attempting these diets must be monitored closely by a physician to prevent complications.[1]
Monica Olivas is a holistic health coach and certified running coach. And as the blog name implies, she loves to run and eat! Running helped her shed 20 pounds, and she’s since competed in 50 half-marathons and 30 marathons. Run Eat Repeat has giveaways for runners, tips for improving distance, and all kinds of healthy, delicious recipe ideas to fuel your next run. Visit the blog.
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