The fad military diet consists of low-calorie, odd food pairings such as bun-less hot dogs with banana, carrots, and broccoli. “Any diet like the military diet that severely limits the amount of calories you consume or eliminates one or more entire food groups puts any individual at risk for nutrient deficiencies,” says Kyle. “This can be more harmful than holding onto those 10 extra lb you’re trying to lose.” (32)

Most fitness and nutrition experts agree that the right way to lose weight is to aim for a safe, healthy rate of weight loss of 1 to 1½ pounds per week. Short-term dramatic weight loss is rarely healthy or sustainable over time. Modification of eating habits along with regular exercise is the most effective way to lose weight over the long term. It is also the ideal way to ensure that the weight stays off.
This woman used to teach web development in a community college, but now she is a full time blogger. How did that happen? Well, among other things, Roni is a mother and a geek, definitely. She was also overweight. What she basically started is a blog, back in 2004 so that she could keep all her family and close friends up to date with her pregnancy. She has always been keen on weight issues, and she has perfectly documented it here, on her blog. She started keeping track of her weight loss scores on her site, and strangely, that motivated her to work even more harder for herself. So, nowadays, it is a blog on which you can find many healthy recipes, tips, insights on how the struggle with weight loss is real, photos and the whole experience to help you catch up with the progress she has made.
About: Christie literally just got going (her first post was in March). But she didn’t waste any time putting it all out there. Her goal is to lose more than 100 pounds and beat a lifelong struggle with depression and anxiety. Her openness caught our attention immediately, and we can’t wait to follow along with her as she takes each and every step.
Nicole Morrissey is a registered dietitian who works specifically with diabetes and weight management. What sets her apart from many other dietitians is that she’s struggled with her own weight since a young age. She was 14 when she went to her first Weight Watchers meeting, and the years that followed brought many ups and downs. Today, she accepts that she “may forever be a work in progress,” so she focuses on balance. That means healthy, good-for-her foods, and doing the active things she loves, like running and hockey. Visit the blog.
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