Rather than a long and low-intensity cardio workout, try the HIIT method of cardio: intense, fast-paced intervals that leave you completely exhausted after only a 20- to 30-minute session. This form of cardio training increases the afterburn effect, allowing your body to continue burning calories long after your workout is over. You can rotate between 30 seconds of your favorite exercises, with rest in between, as long as they work different muscle groups—such as squats, push-ups and kettlebell swings.
If you were to put numbers to it, Julie probably burns 2500 calories per day. If she’s eating 1400 calories per day it leaves her in an 1100 calorie deficit. In six months’ time, she should lose about 53 pounds. In reality, she’ll probably lose about 20 and then get stuck. Unless she does something different with her nutrition, or exercises even more, weight loss will slow down because her metabolic rate will adjust to the fact that it doesn’t have available fat to burn.
Congrats on your transformation! You should feel very proud of yourself to have come so far and to have gotten to the point where you can listen to your stomach. Surprisingly, that simple communication with our body is something that so many of us have trained ourselves to not pay any attention to. After suffering with an eating disorder for about 15 years, I got to the point where I didn’t even know what it felt like to be hungry anymore! I had to really work to “hear” that signal. And you’re right, counting calories can be an obsession that can take over your life and your thoughts, so I think it’s awesome that you have cut back from that and are just listening to your wants and needs and not freaking out over a piece of cake.
Life is constantly moving and we are all busy – this can sometimes be an issue if you’re trying to lose a few pounds however you can’t sit inside all day every day avoiding the outside world! You can still lose weight and have a social life. At the start of my weight loss I still went out for meals, drinks, parties etc, I just monitored what I ate and adjusted the days calories accordingly. 2 years on, I don’t have meals out as much, however if I do I will opt for high protein low carb meals such as a chicken salad, fish and veg, etc and drink water. Sadly I have lost touch with several people throughout this process as I don’t spend all my weekends in pubs/bars/clubs anymore, I don’t go out for meals as much and I will spend most evenings in the gym because I enjoy it. Other people may not understand your goal and therefore might not appear as supportive as you would like them to, don’t let this stop you from doing what you want to do. If you want to go to the gym rather than go out for a meal, your friends will understand, at the same time don’t give up your social life to lose a couple of pounds, life is all about balance.
The trick here is not only to avoid all obvious sources of carbohydrate (sweets, bread, spaghetti, rice, potatoes), but also to be careful with your protein intake. If you eat large amounts of meat, eggs and the like, the excess protein will be converted into glucose in your body. Large amounts of protein can also raise your insulin levels somewhat. This compromises optimal ketosis.
This becomes even more complicated when you consider the variability of the foods we eat. A piece of grass-fed beef usually has less fat by weight than the same cut from a conventionally raised cow. If it has less fat by weight, it will have more protein. For the same 8-ounce piece of meat, it would have less fat and more protein, and fewer total calories. How much less? You can’t be sure, unless you actually test the meat. But then you wouldn’t be able to eat it, so you’d need to get another cut of beef that wouldn’t be exactly the same, so you wouldn’t know the calorie value of that piece of meat either.

Great Article but so way OFF THE MARK to such a degree as to make me cry. Controlling weight gain can only be done by controlling, and reducing, blood levels of INSULIN – and there is no medication that can do that. But, and its a big BUT, one can reduce Insulin very precisely by eliminating sugar and carbohydrates from the diet and fasting, preferably at least 16 hours (I try for 20 hours) between meals. I am a type two diabetic of 25 years duration, and have been doing this for 3 months and not one hypoglycemic attack during this time with a weight loss of 19kgs, down to 69Kgs. To prevent hunger add a healthy, natural fat, such as butter, to your diet. Does wonders. If I understand it correctly the reduction of Insulin below a certain level allows the body access to the body’s fat stores so that it can finally burn off these fat stores.stores. Once Insulin reaches a certain blood level it PREVENTS the burning of fat stores – hence the need to FAST and reduce the Insulin. The fasting is also wonderful for Calorie restriction and it’s benefits. – Just my two cent’s worth – hope its been useful.


What worked for me where I’ve failed in the past. Planning planning and planning. Getting the snacks and protein portions done for the week (salmon, chicken, quinoa and turkey freeze brilliantly) allowing yourself to eat the snacks. Kale freezes brilliantly and is great in the smoothie. Berries are in season in Australia at the moment, bulk buy them,wash them and freeze them. I love quinoa, who knew. And after doing a lot of research, as I’m celiac, I tried the overnight oats with no side effects. And finally I’ve kept a journal that I write in every day, I’ve alwasy been an emotional eater, and this has helped track what’s happened during the day, and how I handled it without turning to food.
About: The thing that’s most appealing about Alexis’ blog is its tagline: “One girl’s adventure in moderation.” It’s a testament to Alexis’s general approach to life — she knows she won’t succeed unless she balances weight loss and being healthy with living life to its fullest. Alexis’ writing style is quirky and fun. It touches serious subjects, but with a light style that will have you feeling inspired and amused by the end of each post.
Katie’s weight has been a challenge her entire life. But after having two boys, she reached an all-time high: 253 pounds. That was when she decided to make a change, but it didn’t happen right away. For the next three years, she dieted and bounced between losing and gaining 50 pounds. Her real weight loss journey began in 2009, when she used calorie counting and running to take off 125 pounds. Today, she writes about maintaining that loss, running, being a mother, and managing a bipolar diagnosis. Visit the blog.
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