"I started Weight Watchers in June 2015, and by December 2015 I had lost 30 pounds by following the plan and counting points. I was walking every day after work and taking short walks during my breaks at work. Then my dad passed away in February 2016, and my weight loss came to a stop. I had gained about five pounds back and was almost ready to quit. But in August 2016 I decided to get back on track. When I started tracking my meals again, the weight just started falling off. Weight Watchers is amazing because it's not a diet! They show you how to live a healthy lifestyle by encouraging you to eat high protein and low sugars, saturated fats and carbs. They also encourage you to make more time for yourself. Be healthy and happy from the inside out!”
Life is constantly moving and we are all busy – this can sometimes be an issue if you’re trying to lose a few pounds however you can’t sit inside all day every day avoiding the outside world! You can still lose weight and have a social life. At the start of my weight loss I still went out for meals, drinks, parties etc, I just monitored what I ate and adjusted the days calories accordingly. 2 years on, I don’t have meals out as much, however if I do I will opt for high protein low carb meals such as a chicken salad, fish and veg, etc and drink water. Sadly I have lost touch with several people throughout this process as I don’t spend all my weekends in pubs/bars/clubs anymore, I don’t go out for meals as much and I will spend most evenings in the gym because I enjoy it. Other people may not understand your goal and therefore might not appear as supportive as you would like them to, don’t let this stop you from doing what you want to do. If you want to go to the gym rather than go out for a meal, your friends will understand, at the same time don’t give up your social life to lose a couple of pounds, life is all about balance.
Want to hear a cliche story about how a guy loses weight? Want to stop swearing while you are trying to lose some weight? You are in the right place! This guy was borderline obese until the age of 25, and he was literally the one who made the geeks in gym class look good. When he met the love of his life, he decided that before proposing to her, he would get in shape – and this is how the title for this blog was created. His name is James Fell, and he is incredible! Even though his weight loss process took a lot of time, it taught him a lot of valuable lessons – he now knows how to eat healthier, how to respect his body, learned the value of slow and steady work, and how to develop passion for physical activities. The thing he realized is that yes, you can have good genetics and work out just a bit, and be fit and healthy, but what you can do is that you can also make yourself do the program and work your body until you make it. This is a fun blog through which you can learn a lot, including how to never stop working on yourself, from every aspect in life.
Think of it as intermittent fasting 2.0 – only a bit more complicated. Ready? Here goes. There are three windows: one to get you started, one to help you reach your goal weight and a maintenance plan. You eat within a 12-hour, 14-hour or 16-hour window depending on which phase you’re in. But what you eat counts, too. The ‘green light’ lists of foods changes with every phase. Still there?

Dieting is the practice of eating food in a regulated and supervised fashion to decrease, maintain, or increase body weight, or to prevent and treat diseases, such as diabetes. A restricted diet is often used by those who are overweight or obese, sometimes in combination with physical exercise, to reduce body weight. Some people follow a diet to gain weight (usually in the form of muscle). Diets can also be used to maintain a stable body weight and improve health.
Since we can’t spot reduce fat, the only way to ever get those flat abs is to burn body fat overall. For this reason, HIIT workouts, exercises that work multiple muscle groups simultaneously (like push ups, squat thrusters etc.), and weight lifting are going to be the most effective fitness strategies for bringing out your six pack because they are the most metabolic. Hours of cardio and tons of crunches are not the way forward here.
About: If we had to sum up Helen’s blog in two words, they would be “creative” and “hilarious.” Because that’s exactly what the blog is...a blend of Helen’s witty writing combined with her pursuit of all things new in the dieting, fitness and weight loss realm — be they inspirational or out in left-field … and everything in between. Helen, a once “healthy living” blogger who gave it up years ago and then recently returned to the world with a new theme — is obsessed with what’s “new,” and she’s the queen of trying it out and letting her readers know if it worked well, or if it didn’t work at all. And that whole “new” theme doesn’t just mean trends...she also loves helping people who are new to weight loss and healthy living succeed.
DO IT: Assume a pushup position with your hands below your shoulders and your body forming a straight line from your head to your heels. This is the starting position. Lifting your right foot off of the floor, drive your right knee towards your chest. Tap the floor with your right foot and then return to the starting position. Alternate legs with each repetition.
Jennifer, I am a little different than you. I have always been a big girl and right now, I am near 200 pounds. I am about 5’3 and I’ve always had trouble losing weight. I’m actually very athletic. I love to play sports and I’m good at them, but I hate running. I also splurge a lot. it’s a bad habit of mine to snack when I’m bored. I’m a recent college student and eating healthy is difficult, not to mention exercise. since I live on the fourth floor, I try to take the stairs only. I’m pretty good about that. I have a slow metabolism and I have no sense of calorie counting. I’m desperate for help, but I need to concentrate on my studies. what advice can you give me?
Nicole Morrissey is a registered dietitian who works specifically with diabetes and weight management. What sets her apart from many other dietitians is that she’s struggled with her own weight since a young age. She was 14 when she went to her first Weight Watchers meeting, and the years that followed brought many ups and downs. Today, she accepts that she “may forever be a work in progress,” so she focuses on balance. That means healthy, good-for-her foods, and doing the active things she loves, like running and hockey. Visit the blog.
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